Activities for kids: What will hatch out of these eggs?

I’m posting my latest activity for all of us kids big and small sticking around the house this weekend. Around here, we are busy painting eggs for our annual dragon egg hunt (and you can, too—see my post here), but this activity is a simple one to fill in some time!

It’s pretty self-explanatory! Just download the sheet here:

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Stay safe, stay well, and stay tuned for more activities!

The dragon hatchery expands

I’m continuing my work as an artist-in-residence with a group of teens at a local specialized learning center. A key goal of the residency is to provide a safe and fun place where the participants can create and do some art therapy.

In the first few weeks, we worked on building and sculpting dragon scales. This quickly migrated into the creation of dragon eggs—a far more ambitious project, and one that requires a great deal of patience.

The students have shown that patience and have enjoyed coming up with the styles, textures, and shapes to go with their eggs. There are many different approaches to this project, as is shown in the photos below . . .

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Many of the students have ambitious ideas and plans for their eggs, so there has been a lot of problem-solving required. Depending on the student’s plan, I’ve had to go and fetch very specific materials or tools to help them achieve their vision. As part of this process, we’ve decided that we should now build “nests” for these eggs. That’s going to be tricky, since I’m sure everyone is going to have a completely different plan . . . but oh, well! That’s what I’m here for.

Not your average eggs . . .

Creative writing demands creative ideas, so in my latest workshop, I led my students in crafting some magical creature eggs. This is a great activity for getting kids to think about the five sense. As they create their eggs, they also have to complete a worksheet that asks them to consider what the egg looks like, what it sounds like, what it smells like, what it feels like to carry, and even what it might feel like to eat (after all, there might be predators after the egg).

Of course, some of those things they have to imagine, but others, such as what it looks like, and what it feels like to touch, are right there for them to explore.

Here are some of the photos of my students’ creations . . .

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St. George’s and the dragon

Famously, it was St. George that defeated the dragon, but this summer I’m teaching Book Publisher’s summer camp at St. George’s school in Vancouver—so crafting dragon eggs seems a perfect fit for our location.  Earlier this week, I led my junior group in an activity to brew magic potions, so designing and decorating dragon eggs became the hands-on activity for the senior group.

Both activities involve A LOT of prep, but preparing the eggs is the worst for me, as I famously hate eggs. So you can imagine what it’s like to have to blow the snot-colored yolk out of twenty eggs. DISGUSTING.

But worth it—I really enjoy seeing my students come up with all sorts of creative designs that help inspire their writing. This activity is especially useful when it comes to teaching imagery and description (especially connected to the five senses). Many of my students have incorporated their eggs into the books they are writing for the camp.

Here is a glimpse at a few of their magical eggs . . .

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