The Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct: Rule #9

Here is the next rule from the Code of Conduct, as described in Spell Sweeper, my latest middle-grade novel, with commentary by the main character Cara Moone.

THE SPELL SWEEPER CODE OF CONDUCT

(Do as I say, not as I bespell)

Rule #9

If you cannot contain it, rope it off and summon the local wizard authority. 

(Seriously, why don’t they just scrap this code and replace it with the phrase: “Just call a wizard!”)

🧹🧹🧹

In Cara’s own words from Spell Sweeper: You’re probably familiar with the bright yellow “caution” tape for securing the scene of an accident. When we do a purge in Bliss territory, it’s procedure to rope off the entire area to ensure no one stumbles upon any magical activity. Our tape reads: Chemical Spill Containment Site: Do Not Cross—because no Bliss would take Danger: Feral Magic at Work seriously.

Spell Sweeper is available now in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.

The Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct: Rule #8

Here is the next rule from the Code of Conduct, as described in Spell Sweeper, my latest middle-grade novel, with commentary by the main character Cara Moone.

THE SPELL SWEEPER CODE OF CONDUCT

(Do as I say, not as I bespell)

Rule #8

Do not be seen, heard, or smelled. 

(They should add “tasted” to this list, because I’m not even a real spell sweeper yet, and I’ve already been nearly eaten twice.)

🧹🧹🧹

If you’ve read Spell Sweeper, then you know Cara runs into a dangerous “mouth-thingy” in the fabric of magic—followed soon after by an angry mama squix. That encounter? Well it’s a bit of a train wreck. 😉

As for me, I have never met a squix or a mouth-thingy in real-life. Though you can swipe to see the time I once faced off against an ornery orc.

Spell Sweeper is available now in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.

The Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct: Rule #7

Here is the next rule from the Code of Conduct, as described in Spell Sweeper, my latest middle-grade novel, with commentary by the main character Cara Moone.

THE SPELL SWEEPER CODE OF CONDUCT

(Do as I say, not as I bespell)

Rule #7

Do not attempt explanation if you are accosted by a Bliss during a purge; summon the local wizard authority. 

(“Nothing to see here, folks—this is definitely not dragon egg yolk smeared all over your porch.”)

🧹🧹🧹

BTW, Spell Sweepers are not only responsible for cleaning up spell dust left behind when wizards cast spells, but also any other magical . . . er, secretions.

Spell Sweeper is available now in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.

The Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct: Rule #6

Here is the next rule from the Code of Conduct, as described in Spell Sweeper, my latest middle-grade novel, with commentary by the main character Cara Moone.

THE SPELL SWEEPER CODE OF CONDUCT

(Do as I say, not as I bespell)

Rule #6

Do not wander off on your own during a purge of a contaminated site.

(Spoken like a true wizard who has never actually had to deal with the results of a Magical Occurrence. The debris from a wizard’s duel can be strewn across a six-mile radius.)

🧹🧹🧹

FYI, most wizards require a talisman to amplify their innate magical ability. Common talismans used in Spell Sweeper are wands, amulets, or rings, but they can be anything. There’s a story that Riva Dragonsong (the founder of Cara’s school) once used a wet noodle to repel an entire horde of hydras. Swipe to see some talismans (sorry, no noodles featured).

Spell Sweeper is available now in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.

The Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct: Rule #5

Here is the next rule from the Code of Conduct, as described in Spell Sweeper, my latest middle-grade novel, with commentary by the main character Cara Moone.

THE SPELL SWEEPER CODE OF CONDUCT

(Do as I say, not as I bespell)

Rule #5

Trim your broom after each spell sweep. If an untrimmed broom is used on a different site, it could result in DDo not leave your gear unattended in Bliss areas. This includes when visiting the bathroom.

(Which is convenient if you have contracted Demon Orc Flu and have a sudden bout of magical diarrhea—you can just whip out your broom and make quick work of the mess.)

🧹🧹🧹

FYI, non-wizards are called “Blisses” because they are ignorant to the existence of wizards and, as the saying goes, “ignorance is bliss.” Also, swipe to see some of the essential spell sweeper gear: goggles, mini-broom, and some “neutralizer”—in this case, it’s a bottle of “Moone Brew,” Cara’s self-made solution to combating toxic spell slime.

Spell Sweeper is available now in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.

The Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct: Rule #4

Here is the next rule from the Code of Conduct, as described in Spell Sweeper, my latest middle-grade novel, with commentary by the main character Cara Moone.

THE SPELL SWEEPER CODE OF CONDUCT

(Do as I say, not as I bespell)

Rule #4

Trim your broom after each spell sweep. If an untrimmed broom is used on a different site, it could result in Do NOT keep any broom straw contaminated with spell dust for personal use. All residue must be deposited in the appropriate receptacles.

(I mean, haven’t we all pined to keep just a little bit of that gray gunge we find at the bottom of the mop bucket?)

🧹🧹🧹

As you can read, Cara considers herself the Cinderella of the wizarding society—and she’s none too happy about it!

Spell Sweeper is available now in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.

The Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct: Rule #3

I’m posting the Code of Conduct from Spell Sweeper, my latest middle-grade novel, with commentary by the main character Cara Moone.

THE SPELL SWEEPER CODE OF CONDUCT

(Do as I say, not as I bespell)

Rule #3

Trim your broom after each spell sweep. If an untrimmed broom is used on a different site, it could result in cross-contamination and possibly hazardous consequences. (Ka-boom!)

🧹🧹🧹

As is explained in Spell Sweeper, as the broomcorn absorbs spell dust, it grows and changes color, usually red, blue, or purple. You can swipe to see an example of a broom that has some spell dust!

Spell Sweeper is available now in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.

The Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct: Rule #2

I’m posting the Code of Conduct from Spell Sweeper, my latest middle-grade novel, with commentary by the main character Cara Moone.

THE SPELL SWEEPER CODE OF CONDUCT

(Do as I say, not as I bespell)

Rule #2

Do not lose or damage your broom. (Especially when it’s a cool one made of dragonwood.)

🧹🧹🧹

Below is the broom that served as the inspiration for the one Cara uses in the book (well, after her original one gets, uh . . . eaten). I discovered this broom at Granville Island Broom Co. and instantly knew it had to be Cara’s.

Spell Sweeper is available now in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.

The Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct: Rule #1

We’ve had the twelve days of Christmas, so I figured I would give you twelve days of entries from the Spell Sweeper Code of Conduct—with commentary by Cara Moone.

THE SPELL SWEEPER CODE OF CONDUCT

(Do as I say, not as I bespell)

Rule #1

Do not attempt clean-up of a contaminated site unless directed to do so by your crew leader. (Side note: Yeah, like I’m wandering around, looking for extra things to scrub.)

🧹🧹🧹


Truthfully, these “side-sections” of the book were some of my favorite parts to write, because I could just let Cara’s voice do its thing!

By the way, one of the contaminated sites that Cara and her dysfunctional crew clean up in the book. These are my own photos of the Whistler train wreck, which I first visited in September 2019. At that time, I was just beginning to think of an idea for a book that would have “something to do with brooms.” It turned out that this location became the basis for a major scene in Spell Sweeper. (But let’s just say the site turned out to be a lot more “contaminated” and, uh . . . monster infested, in the book than it is in real life.)

Spell Sweeper is available now in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.

Kiki’s Delivery Service: Exploring the DNA of Spell Sweeper

I revisited many “magical learning” and “broom” books as I was working on Spell Sweeper, and one of my favorites is Kiki’s Delivery Service by Eiko Kadono. (The classic book that inspired the beloved film of the same name.) 

Thirteen-year-old Kiki sets off, in the tradition of witches, to find a town to serve for a year. When she arrives at the seaside town of Koriko, she starts her own business—delivering parcels by broomstick. At first, she assumes it will be easy—hey, she’s Kiki!¬—but she soon discovers that winning over the locals of Koriko is not so easy. Thankfully, she’s got her wise-cracking cat Jiji on her side . . . as well as her magical broom. 

This book has many charming details, but I think my favorite is the silver bells that Kiki’s mother hangs from the treetops—when they ring, they signal that Kiki’s has zoomed into them.

The book in the photo is translated by the version I have is translated by Emily Balistrierie and illustrated by Yuta Onanda.

My own book, Spell Sweeper, is available in hardbound, digital, and audiobook formats from your favorite outlet.