Inspiring young imaginations in Korea

Inspiring young imaginations in Korea

can_embassy_lef&marcie

I recently returned from Korea, where I taught a creative writing camp for kids and presented at the Canadian Embassy in Seoul.

creativewritingcontest_poster.jpgA contest to celebrate Canada150

The event at the embassy was an award ceremony for a creative writing competition that was held in honour of Canada’s 150th birthday. The contest was sponsored by The Korea Herald, Air Canada, the Seoul Metropolitan Government and CWC (the Creative Writing for Children Society of Vancouver, a company I co-founded in 2004).

Contest judged by Canadian authors

Over 200 students from elementary, middle, and high schools across Korea entered the contest and were reviewed and judged by three Canadian authors: myself, Stacey Matson, and Kallie George.

It was a great honour to be a judge and to read through all the diverse entries. The theme was a difficult one; in some way, the entrants had to incorporate the idea of “150.” It was quite entertaining to see how the kids wove this theme into their short stories!

A ceremony at the Canadian embassy

The award winners were announced on July 1 (Canada Day) and the ceremony was held on July 22nd at the Canadian embassy in Seoul. Joon Park, who is the CWC co-founder, Stacey Matson, Marcie Nestman, and I attended the ceremony on behalf of CWC. Unfortunately, Kallie George could not accompany us, but she was there in spirit.

can_embassy_lef_presents_podium

During the ceremony, we were privleged to meet the contestants and award them their prizes. There were 30 winners in various categories, with the top winner receiving a free round-trip ticket on Air Canada to travel to anywhere in Canada.

After the ceremony, Stacey and I held a Q&A session with the young writers. We were so impressed by their thoughtful and in-depth questions. I’m so proud of all the kids who entered and of their beautiful words that they dared to share.

can_embassy_awardwinners

 

All contest winners will have their stories published in an anthology.

For more information, check out the article on The Korea Herald website.

About the Creative Writing for Children Society

CWC is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to enhancing the creativity, confidence and writing capacity of children through tailored writing programs. In CWC’s programs, students are guided by professional authors, illustrators, editors, and actors to write and illustrate their own books, which are professionally desktop published. Founded in 2004, CWC is based in Vancouver, BC.

 

 

Advertisements

Cool creative writing activities—pirate style

Cool creative writing activities—pirate style

Last week author and colleague Kallie George and I finished up a two week creative writing camp for kids aged 9-12 through CWC. The theme was one of our faves: pirates!

Kallie and I have taught many camps before, but we wanted to try and do something a little different this time. Even though the goal of the camp was to just immerse kids in creative writing, we decided we needed to give them a goal.

So, we decided to have them produce handmade pirate “journals” that would chronicle the adventure of a character who ends up sailing the seas.

Once we had that decided, it was just a matter of developing and fine-tuning some topics . . .

Day 1: Introduction – What kind of pirate are you?

For the first day, we just warmed up the kids by introducing them to our theme, having them take a fun quiz (What kind of pirate are you?), and doing some writing warm-ups.

Day 2: Plot me a treasure!

We introduced our overall goal, to make a pirate log book and began the project by drawing treasure maps. One of my goals in all of my writing classes is to have the kids work hard on developing better ideas. To this end, I had them complete a brainstorming sheet before they began drawing.

The brainstorming sheet outlined various features they might include on their map and come up with inventive names for them. I find that many young writers will just pick the first name that pops into their head and not give it a second thought. The brainstorming sheet helped them come up with a much more imaginative and evocative world for their journal.

map01map02map03map04map05

This was also the day the students began handwriting their journals. Many of them chose to do rough copies that they could then copy into their final booklets (after a quick edit, of course).

Day 3: Pirate Particulars

Pirates love clothes, so on Day 3 we had the students approach character design through a strong visual approach. The kids designed a complete pirate wardrobe for a character, including clothes, tools, tattoos, and the ultimate fashion accessory—a pirate pet.

pirateparticulars01pirateparticulars02pirateparticulars03

Day 4: ARG! Pirate Lingo

One of the most fun things about pirates is the way they talk, so we led an activity to help students practice pirate lingo.

Day 5: Settings that Sail

This day was all about the ship and the flag. We showed the students diagrams of famous ships from film and literature (my personal favorite being The Dawn Treader), and went over the flags used by real-life pirates.

Afterwards, the students brainstormed and designed their own pirate flags. Once again, I had the students do a few thumbnail designs before committing to a final since this does always seem to turn up the best ideas.

flagdesigns01

I ended up designing my own pirate flag, too . . . one to go with a book I’m currently writing.

flagdesigns02-captaintraxx

Day 6: Treasure Ahoy!

We had started the camp giving the kids miniature treasure chests loaded with gold, rubies, and pears. On this day, I brought in other pieces of treasure—mirrors, kaleidoscopes, ancients coins, pots, and so forth. Each student picked an object (and many of them were actual antiques) and were asked to describe it using the five senses.

Once we shared our descriptions, the next task was to invent one magical or unusual thing about the object. So, for example, one student decided that a kaleidoscope showed the true path to the pirate treasure and the other decided that the mirror had captured the soul of a wayward sailor.

description01felix&charlottepirate-treasurechestpiratecamp

Afterwards, we did a visualization activity in which the students all shut their eyes and we played the sounds of a ship at sea during a storm. Afterwards, the students wrote about the experience, concentrating on the five senses.

The purpose of this day was to just make sure the students understood the concept of show-don’t-tell and to help them invest more description into their stories.

Day 7: Sea Shanties

This was one of the most fun days in the camp, as we had the students listen to a cargo of sea shanties then craft their own. Some were ballads, some were call-and-response songs, and others were more free form. Also, most of them were about how to drop me, “Cap’n Wiz.”

seashanty01seashanty02seashanty03

Day 8: Legends & Lore

This was a day to bring on the sea serpents! We explored real legends and myths of sea creatures and then asked the students to think about their own monsters by drawing and sculpting them out of clay. Of course, afterwards, they could incorporate these creatures into their pirate journals.

seacreature01seacreature02seacreature03

Day 9: Message in a Bottle

By now, it must be obvious that we like buidling stuff in our creative writing camps! On this day, the students wrote messages and put them in bottles, which they painted to make them look like they had been adrift for awhile. The story prompt here was that the students’ characters could be sending out a cry for help.

Day 10: Seal ‘Em Shut

This was the day the kids finished up working on their journals. We had a plan to tea-stain the journals, but then were a bit worried about some of the ink smudging. In any case, this is something the kids could do at home.

The main task we wanted to focus on was making sure the covers look interesting. We procured some brown cardstock and had the kids draw on them with metallic markers. We also got some wax to drip overtop so that they could “seal” them with an impression of a skull or some other design.

piratejournal01piratejournal02piratejournal03piratejournal04piratejournal05piratejournal06piratejournal07piratejournal08piratejournal09

I’m pretty impressed with the final products and, considering this was the first time we did this project, it turned out rather smoothly.

Well, now it’s time for me to switch gears and turn my attention to my next summer creative writing workshop series: Galaxy Camp!

 

 

The Prehistoric Painter

cwccoq-pp-cavepainting04

I’m currently teaching a series of workshops through CWC called Picture Perfect: Exploring Creative Writing through the Lens of Art History.

I’ve delivered this program several times before, but it continues to evolve. This time around, I was given more weeks than usual to deliver workshop series, so I ended up adding some units. Despite this, I still feel like we are zooming through history and hardly doing anything justice.

For our first project, we explored the very first recorded art that we know of: cave paintings. After viewing images and videos of some of the famous sites from around the world, I introduced a project in which the students could create cave-painting style images on rocks. Afterwards, they were assigned to write a short story about a character who is the first member of a society to paint on a cave wall.

Doing the activity helped them put their minds in the right framework. One of the interesting things about this course has been trying to put everything into context for the young students. For example, they simply weren’t aware that prehistoric and ancient artists (not to mention Medieval ones) had a limited color palette available to them.

Here are some photos of our project in progress . . .

cwccoq-pp-cavepainting06

cwccoq-pp-cavepainting01

cwccoq-pp-cavepainting02

cwccoq-pp-cavepainting03

cwccoq-pp-cavepainting05

cwccoq-pp-cavepainting07

cwccoq-pp-cavepainting08

The dragon hatchery expands

I’m continuing my work as an artist-in-residence with a group of teens at a local specialized learning center. A key goal of the residency is to provide a safe and fun place where the participants can create and do some art therapy.

In the first few weeks, we worked on building and sculpting dragon scales. This quickly migrated into the creation of dragon eggs—a far more ambitious project, and one that requires a great deal of patience.

The students have shown that patience and have enjoyed coming up with the styles, textures, and shapes to go with their eggs. There are many different approaches to this project, as is shown in the photos below . . .

clc-egg12

clc-egg10

clc-egg11

clc-egg08

clc-egg07

clc-egg09

clc-egg06

clc-egg06a

clc-egg06b

clc-egg06c

Many of the students have ambitious ideas and plans for their eggs, so there has been a lot of problem-solving required. Depending on the student’s plan, I’ve had to go and fetch very specific materials or tools to help them achieve their vision. As part of this process, we’ve decided that we should now build “nests” for these eggs. That’s going to be tricky, since I’m sure everyone is going to have a completely different plan . . . but oh, well! That’s what I’m here for.

Art therapy, dragon style

clc_dragonscale10

I’m currently working as an artist-in-residence with a group of very creative teens at a local specialized learning center. A key component of my program is to provide a safe and fun place to get creative—in other words, it’s a sort of art therapy program. (Though, for me personally, I rarely think of creating art as anything other than therapeutic.)

For my first few sessions, I decided to introduce a theme of dragons and magical creatures. I recently was able to roll out a workshop to build dragon scales in Korea and it worked so well, that I thought I would get these teens to try there hand at the same activity.

clc_dragonscale01

clc_dragonscale02

clc_dragonscale03

clc_dragonscale04

clc_dragonscale05

clc_dragonscale06

clc_dragonscale07

clc_dragonscale09

clc_dragonscale08

clc_dragonscale11

clc_dragonscale12

I knew the dragon scale project would serve as a nice warmup for us before we get into the more ambitious endeavor: dragon eggs.

Scale or egg, the process requires a lot of patience and attention to detail, but I have personally found it wonderfully cathartic.

We’re still finishing up the scales, but many of the students have now moved on to the egg building project. Along the way, we are sketching pictures of what will come out of the egg and we may even get to sculpt baby creatures as well.

Yep, we’ve got our own little hatchery going!

clc_egg01a

clc_egg01b

clc_egg01c

clc_egg02

clc_egg02a

clc_egg03

clc_egg4a

clc_egg04b

clc_egg05

I’ll be sure to post more photos of these creations as they progress. So far, they are looking great.

Potions and spells at the Magic, Monsters, and Mystery camp

cwc-mmm2016-potion00

Even though my wife and I have left Korea behind and are now exploring Old Shanghai for a bit of R&R, we are still reflecting on our wonderful writing camp and basking in the glow of its success.

We tried out many different writing, artistic, and acting activities and they all turned out really well—one in particular was to my great surprise. This was a workshop on magic potions. I’ve done this workshop many times before back in Canada, but what I would call the deluxe version: the students actually mix different magical ingredients and record their observations and sensory reactions. Afterwards, they use the experience to help inject more detail and description into their stories.

I didn’t have the ability to bring all my magical ingredients on a long-haul flight over the Pacific, so decided to take a different approach to the potions. Instead of having the students brew them, they would use the workshop as an inspiration prop-building exercise.

So, instead of bring overall liquids and powders, I brought over beads, feather clippings, moss, and different coloured sands to help inspire the activity. (Even so, a security officer still opened my box of “ingredients” at airport customs and surveyed them with a skeptical eye.)

We started the activity with an ice-breaking quiz: So You think You’re a Wizard. The main purpose of the quiz is to bring some humour to the class, but also to start getting the kids to think imaginatively. (Also, the student who scored the highest to make her potion first!)

cwc-mmm2016-wizquiz.jpg

I supplied the students with very tiny bottles. My instinct would be to normally give them bigger bottles, but, once again, packing was an issue, so I brought a zip-loc bag of the miniature vials and each student was given three.

What surprised me was how careful and pedantic the students were with building these props. Because the bottles were so small, they filled them bead by bead, grain by grain, clipping by clipping. Some added a bit of paint water, drop by drop, left over from our dragon scale activity to help add a bit more magic to their brew.

Here are some of their wonderful creations . . .

cwc-mmm2016-potion04.jpg

cwc-mmm2016-potion03

cwc-mmm2016-potion02

cwc-mmm2016-potion01

 

Afterwards, the students took inspiration from their props and wrote spells and stories. Here’s a glimpse of some of their ghastly imaginings . . .

cwc-mmm2016-potion10

cwc-mmm2016-potion09

cwc-mmm2016-potion08

cwc-mmm2016-potion07

cwc-mmm2016-potion06

cwc-mmm2016-potion05

 

Making magic with magazines

cwccamp2016-magazine-000

I just wrapped up a busy two-day creative writing camp with fellow author Kallie George. We decided to go “old school” and have the kids design and mock up their own magazines on paper dummies.

Kallie and I both used to do these sorts of activities when we were kids. We would hand-make and “self-publish” our own magazines and books. There were crudely drawn illustrations, dedications, table of contents, and self indulgent copyright pages (every job in the book publication or “impressum” was assigned to ourselves).

So, we thought we’d nudge the kids away from the pseudo-polish and falsely perceived instant gratification of the Internet and work on something a little more immediately tangible.

Over the two days, students developed a theme, wrote articles, interviews, advice columns, and product reviews, and came up with advertisements and games for the activity pages.

cwccamp2016-magazine-00b

It was so much fun to see the kids embrace their passions and work with their hands. We had magazines on the theme of sports, some on the theme of Harry Potter, another on Greek Gods, and some on magical creatures. We even had a few magazines based on reading and overall creativity.

Some students chose to handwrite and illustrate everything in their magazines, while others typed up their stories then turned the raw text over to me so that I could print them out in columns. This is where my years of graphic design experience came in to use; I was able to quickly mock up templates for comic books, word searches, and masthead designs to allow the students to achieve a bit more structure in their magazines. They would then paste these elements into their magazines and organize illustrations around them.

Here are a few more photos from our hectic workshop . . .

That last image is an advertisement for ketchup and eggs . . . because every student who I mentor knows how much I hate those things! So, inevitably, I am attacked by advertisements promoting them.

Next, my wife Marcie and I are off to Korea to teach a writing camp on Magic, Monsters, and Mystery. And, somehow, amidst all this hubbub, we’ve found time to celebrate the holidays and even do a bit of our own writing.